Nursing Studies Taekwondo champion!

When we moved to Scotland with my family in July 2017 we were began to look for family activities that we could do together. With my wife, Teresa, and three kids, Mary, Gordon and Evan (ages 9, 6 and 5), we took up Taekwondo with the Intrepid Taekwondo club in Inverkeithing. From our inception in July we moved from white belts and earned our yellow belts in February.

On June 3, 2018 Teresa and I competed in the Scottish National Taekwondo Championships at the Grangemouth sportsplex. This was our first Taekwondo competition. The competetion had two categories: patterns and sparing. Competitors for each category were further divided by belt level.  At the Championships I earned a second place finish in the patterns category and a first place finish in the sparring along side my wife, Teresa, who also earned a first place finish in the women’s sparring.

Andrew Waddington, MSc Advanced Nursing Practice

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Coffee Round 2

This was the second ‘Coffee Rounds’ event hosted by University of Edinburgh nursing students to bring awareness to the Nursing Now campaign and to show support of nurses working ‘on the shop floor’. This event was held on June 1st at the Western General Hospital in Edinburgh when we were fortunate to have Alex McMahon, Executive Director Nursing, Midwifery and Allied Health Professionals and Professor Aisha Holloway, Head of Nursing Studies at the University of Edinburgh in attendance. Once again, it was amazing to see the smiles that were generated by the simple act of handing out a coffee. Jiayan Tang, MsC Advancing Nursing Practice student, reflects further on this experience:

I am so glad to attend the “Nursing Now” activity. We offered free coffee and chatted with nurses in the Western General Hospital. We expressed our gratitude for their hard work. At the same time, we also asked some questions, such as “What is the most challenging part of nursing” and “What is the most rewarding part of nursing”. Generally, when talking about the challenges, most nurses mentioned the time management, patients’ non-compliance, unrealistic expectation from patients and their families, the lack of staff, finances and resources, etc. Besides, they felt rewarding to see patients getting better and return to their normal life. Patients’ smile and appreciation can make them feel happy and empowered to continue their nursing work. Their answers can help policymakers know how to support nurses and raise the profile and status of nurses. In addition, people attending the activity were from many different countries, such as Canada, China, Ghana, etc. In this way, this activity provided me and other people w

ith different national background the opportunity to know the difference in nurses’ work, attitudes and opinions in different countries or working setting. Moreover, policymakers and nurses themselves can work together to lead, learn and build a global movement and then improve health globally.

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TED and teas

From November to March MsC Advancing Nursing Practice Students met informally outside of class to regroup, reconnect and share challenges and innovations in nursing in our home countries.  To bridge conversation there was of course tea, but we would also start each session with a TED talk to provide inspiration and recall of practices undertaken at home.  We met six times and watch the following TEDs:

Yin Wang reflects on how the TED and Teas enhanced here learning experience while at the University of Edinburgh:

In the last two semesters, my colleagues and I gathered together to watch one TED about once a month, with a lot of delicious biscuits and teas. TED and Teas is an interesting and meaningful activity for me. So I want to show my gratitude to the organizer and the Nursing Department!

When I was in China, I usually used TED as a way to learn English and overlooked the content of it. I just watched it and wrote unfamiliar vocabularies down. But in TED and Teas, every time Andrew would choose a TED relating health care for us; after watching it, we would have a discussion about it. I learnt a lot from those TEDs and discussions and got new perspectives to reflect on nursing related issues, such as the nurse social statues, nursing education and so on. These issues are also closely connected with the courses I have taken, which are very helpful.

On the other hand, TED and teas also helped me to fit in the new environment. As an international student, at first, I felt nervous in face of different society and culture. However, in TED and teas, all of us had the opportunities to share the culture with each other. This activity is like a bridge for me to the new life. I am gradually familiar with my colleagues and receive support from them. For example, when I got some questions about the papers, they were always willing to help me.

TED and Teas is a platform where we discuss nursing, culture, our life and so on. I enjoyed the TED, teas, and all times spent with my colleagues.

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Presenting at the Taiwan Scientific Symposium

It is always excited to present your work with audiences from different field. On 7thApril 2018, I presented my work at the Taiwan Scientific Symposium in Edinburgh, which was organised by the Ministry of Science and Technology. As it was my third time attending the symposium I thought it would be good to do something different this year. Therefore, I submitted an abstract and put myself forward to give an oral presentation. My doctoral study is about nurses’ fever knowledge and fever management and I have presented on this several times but this was my first time presenting in Mandarin. I felt nervous and excited at the same time.

The aim of the symposium was for researchers from Taiwan who are currently in the UK to present their studies and also to network, and learn about each other’s work. Researchers from different areas were given 12 minutes to introduce their study. The presenters all had different professional backgrounds, such as economics, physics, biology medicine, informatics and nursing (me!). It was a challenge to present to researchers from different backgrounds in such a short time. At the beginning of the symposium, everyone was asked to scan a QR code through each their mobile device. After scanning, a webpage would appear, which had a list of presenters, and all the audiences could vote for the best presentation on the day through the webpage. This made the presentation more stressful. I managed to complete the presentation in time followed by really nice discussion with the audience. To my delight I actually won the ‘best presentation’ award. I was so pleased and especially as I felt that I was representing Nursing Studies.

After my presentation, a few people came to asked questions about my research and we had a good discussion. I was glad that my study was discussed and noticed by people with different areas of expertise. It was one of my most amazing day’s in 2018.

Anny Chen, Doctoral Student, Nursing Studies

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Visit by Deputy Chief Nurse in Public Health England

We were absolutely delighted recently to have an audience with Joanne Bosanquet, the Deputy Chief Nurse in Public Health England where we had the opportunity to hear her inspirational journey in her nursing career. A great mixture of undergraduate, master and PhD students attended the event and they all came from different parts of the world (Canada, China, Ghana, Indonesia, Malaysia, Saudi Arabia, Taiwan and the UK).

We kicked off the event with some pre-talk tea, coffee, biscuits, rainbow fruit skewers and a couple of photos. Chaired by Professor Aisha Holloway, Joanne then started with her aspiration to be a nurse. She loves to be around people and she recalled when she was young she put a bandage on her teddies! Interestingly, when Joanne was about to apply for a nursing school, she was told that she’s not good enough to be a nurse. Joanne mentioned that it was difficult for her to hear those words, but she did not let them change her mind and took them as a challenge instead. It’s amazing to see how far she has come now.

Challenges should be seen as an opportunity to grow was Joanne’s strong take-home message here. She also highlighted the importance of being surrounded by positive people that we can ask for support and advice.

Joanne continued her story with the jobs that she had taken in different nursing fields before she finally found her passion for public health. We were very impressed with her wealth of experience and two hours passed by without we noticing it. In the end, Joanne reminded us that nurses have gained more responsibilities and autonomy in healthcare. Therefore, we must continue to grow as professionals and equip ourselves with leadership and advocacy skills.

Catherine Clarissa, Postgraduate Research Student, Nursing Studies

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Anyone for coffee?

On March 8th 2018 I went to the  Royal Infirmary Edinburgh (RIE) along with seven of my colleagues engaged in graduate nursing studies at the University of Edinburgh to profile the launch of Nursing Now—a  global campaign aimed to raise the profile of nurses.  To embody the essence of the Nursing Now campaign, we graduate students went to  the nursing units at RIE to give nurses a gift of coffee as gesture of gratitude.Nursing Now RIE

One hundred and twenty cups of coffee were handed out on over sixteen nursing units!  It was amazing to see the response of the staff nurses when the we came around to hand out the coffees.  Many of them saw us coming and asked cynically “oh you brought us coffee?”  When we said,”yes we did, would you like one?” It was amazing, the nurses  body posture became relaxed and a smile stretched from ear to ear. “Really!” They respond,  “You shouldn’t have, that’s really very nice of you!” Many would said.  Some, were a bit more suspicious: “what’s the catch?”  “Nothing” we said, “we are nurses from different parts of the world doing our graduate work and we want to say thank you as nurses for the great work that you do.”  When we introduce ourselves as nurses, I think that opened the conversation. It seemed that nurses did not expect to be sought out specifically to be thanked, and it was apparent that they appreciated the gesture. Nursing Now RIE

To understand the challenges of nurses and to get an understanding of how nurses could support other nurse in their work we asked many nurses on our rounds “If you could change the world tomorrow as a nurse, what would you do?”  We documented the response as we went around (see photo attached). Common responses included “more staff” and  “better pay”, with variations in that theme being “just fill the positions we have,” and “can we show people what the actual cost of  health care is.”   Many nurses wanted  “to have more involvement in the resuscitation status of patients” and decisions around health care structure and delivery stating:  “involve nurses at all levels of decisions making.” Unique responses included “use Facebook,” and “support nurses working full scope” to “show patients care and most importantly, LOVE”. Nurses Wish List

What struck me about this experience was how committed nurses are to their work and their patients; and nurses want to get it right!  I am reassured that nurses will have the capacity and inspiration to be the leaders of the future.  By supporting each other,  I am certain we nurses will further find energy and capacity to create new directions in healthcare.

Andrew Waddington, RN from Calgary, Canada

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Nursing Now Launch!

Nursing Now Logo

Nursing Now is a global campaign which launches this week in collaboration with the World Health Organisation and International Council of Nurses. Nursing Now is based on the findings of the Triple Impact report. The report concluded that as well as improving health globally, empowering nurses would contribute to improved gender equality as the vast majority of nurses are women, and build stronger economies.

Nurses and nursing students from the University of Edinburgh and NHS Lothian are joining the international launch this week by involving Edinburgh in the global conversation and giving nurses a voice in the future of healthcare.

Representatives of Nursing Now from the University of Edinburgh will be visiting the wards of the Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh to take coffee to the nurses on duty to thank them for the care they are giving – and to let them know their voice matters.

Nursing Now continues to highlight the essential role and crucial knowledges which nurses bring to healthcare – to elevate the imperative work of nurses worldwide we are going to as the nurses of Edinburgh “If you could change the world tomorrow, as a nurse….”

The Nursing Now global campaign launched 27 February 2018, tickets available for the Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh event Thursday 1 March 2018.

Andrew Waddington, RN
(MsC Nursing, University of Edinburgh)

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Suffragettes: A 100 years of women’s suffrage

‘A special and important day to celebrate’ — Professor Aisha Holloway

Today, February 6th 2018 marks 100 years since women over 30 first got the vote following the passing of the 1918 Representation of the People Act. All men of 21 and older got the vote as a result of the Act but women had to wait another ten years. It was 1969 before the voting age was lowered to 18 for both men and women.

For me this is a special and important day to celebrate because nursing is a predominantly female workforce and the hard won Nurses’ Registration Act in 1919 came hot on the heels of women’s suffrage and the role nurses played in the First World War. This was certainly not a coincidence.

A special and important person to celebrate on this day is the surgeon and suffragette Dr Elsie Inglis who was a pioneer for women’s rights, health and welfare and an alumna of the University of Edinburgh. Indeed the Old Medical School Courtyard was recently named in her honour. Dr Inglis was born in 1864 in India where her father worked for the East India Company. After the family returned to Edinburgh, she studied medicine at the then University of Edinburgh’s ‘Revolutionary School of Medicine for Women’ and qualified as a doctor in 1894.

Dr Elsie Inglis

Dr Elsie Inglis (Photo credit: Wellcome Collection)

Inglis’s vision as a woman doctor was to raise awareness of the poor conditions and improve standards of care for many of the city’s women. She decided to do this by providing all-women services by nurses, doctors and others.  In 1894 she opened the ‘Nursing Home for Working Women’ in George Square with an all-female staff which then moved to the High Street in 1904. It is said that her work in the community where she witnessed many inequalities especially for women made her very aware of the need to promote their rights. This motivated her to become an active suffragette, forming the Scottish Women’s Suffragette Federation in 1906.

 

With the advent of the First World War in 1914 Inglis proposed setting up a number of female only units to treat the British troops fighting on the Western Front (France, Belgium and Serbia). Her proposal to the War Office was met with the patronising response ‘My good lady, go home and sit still’. Following further rejection by the Red Cross and the Royal Army Medical Corps she was undeterred and founded the Scottish Women’s Hospitals Committee which oversaw the establishment of four Scottish Women’s Hospitals and 14 medical units across Europe.   The hospitals were staffed only by women who were nurses, doctors, cooks, drivers, cooks as well as surgeons.

The Scottish Women’s Hospitals were well known for their much lower mortality rates than traditional military hospitals operating at that time despite coping with a horrendous typhus epidemic, typhoid and cholera as well as the terrible injuries suffered by the soldiers in the trenches and thousands killed.

Dr Inglis survived being a prisoner of war and returned to Edinburgh where she sadly died in November 1917. Although she did not survive to see the Armistice or votes for women they are an important part of her legacy. It is fitting therefore that Dr Inglis’ legacy and life were celebrated on the centenary of her death in St Giles’ Cathedral in November 2017. It is equally fitting that we remember her today as a suffragette and a carer who combined both passions to defend women’s rights, health and welfare.

Pam Smith,
Professorial Fellow

(Sources: Undiscovered Scotland 2000-2018; Dr Elsie Inglis to be honoured: The Herald: Sunday Herald, 22nd November 2017; Scottish Women’s Hospitals: Dr Elsie Inglis WW1s unsung hero)

 

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Graduate and Undergraduate Connections

To be an outstanding nurse requires intentional collaboration both inter and intra professionally.  Through  collaboration nurses can synergies on projects and opportunities but also take advantages of moments  to reinforce ones knowledge by teaching, coaching and  mentoring. The mentorship tea scheduled for January 24th is an opportunity for graduate/undergraduate nursing students to engage in all of the above activities. In building informal relationships and sharing experiences allows peer mentorship to develop: a bi-directional encounter where experienced graduate nurses can share their nursing background and knowledge while undergrads can also provide new ideas from their varied backgrounds and inject new energy into old problems requiring new solutions. We hope that many nursing students can attend.

Andrew Waddington
MSc Advancing Nursing Practice
EUSA PGT Rep SHSS

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