Prof Toni Gomila

Affiliation: University of the Balearic Islands

I’m currently Full Professor of Psychology (Thinking and Language), at the Psychology Departament of the University of the Balearic Islands. My background is in Philosophy (PhD in 1990, “After the Computational Mind”), and my interests have centered on issues at the intersection between philosophy of mind, psychology and cognitive science: representation and meaning, expression and intersubjectivity, intentional explanation and rationality, also taking an evolutionary perspective into account. My last book is “Verbal Minds: Language and the Arquitecture of the Mind” (Elsevier, 2013). I’m currently working on moral psychology.

 

Dr Nikki Kiyimba

Affiliation: University of Chester

Dr Nikki Kiyimba is Senior Lecturer and Programme Leader for MSc in Therapeutic Practice for Psychological Trauma. Nikki is also a lecturer and supervisor on the DProf Counselling/Psychological Trauma. She has been working as a Clinical Psychologist within the NHS for a number of years with a particular interest in working with clients with severe and enduring mental health problems, including personality disorder, psychosis, childhood trauma, dissociative disorders and PTSD. Nikki’s main interest is in qualitative research, particularly using discursive approaches to investigate therapeutic interactions.

Email: n.kiyimba@chester.ac.uk

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Dr Chisomo Kalinga

Affiliation: University of Edinburgh

Dr Chisomo Kalinga is a Wellcome medical humanities postdoctoral fellow at the Centre of African Studies at the University of Edinburgh. Her work investigates literary traditions and community health narratives in Malawi and its border countries. As part of the project, she collaborated with Chancellor College at the University of Malawi to launch the first medical humanities conference and network for Malawiana studies. She was most recently a postdoctoral fellow at the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities (IASH) at the University of Edinburgh. Her PhD was completed at King’s College London (2014) and offered a comparative study of Malawian and American AIDS fiction. Her research interests are sexuality, health, wellbeing, traditional healing and witchcraft and their narrative representation in African print and oral literatures.

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Dr Anneke Sools

Affiliation: University of Twente

Anneke Sools is Assistant Professor at the department of Psychology, Health and Technology at the University of Twente (Enschede, The Netherlands). She is also Program Director of the Storylab (Dutch expert centre in the area of narrative psychology, health, and technology connected to the University of Twente). Sools is the recipient of the 2018 Early Career Award from AERA (American Educational Research Association) Narrative SIG (Special Interest Group). Her PhD dissertation at the University of Humanistic Studies in Utrecht concerned narrative research methodology in the context of health promotion. She received a MSc Degree in Psychology of Culture and Religion from the University of Nijmegen. Her MSc thesis was awarded the Professor Halkes Thesis Award in 2001. For some years she has been a member of the advisory board of the Centre for Narrative Research (University of East London) and a member of the science committee of the international conference Narrative Matters. In 2010 she founded the Network for Narrative Research Netherlands together with Floor Basten from Campus Orléon. Her current research focuses on the construction of alternative future stories in the face of uncertainty, precarity, and possibility-reducting circumstances.

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Dr Michelle O’Reilly

Affiliation: University of Leicester

Michelle O’Reilly is a Senior Lecturer at the University of Leicester, working for the Greenwood Institute of Child Health and a Research Consultant for Leicestershire Partnership NHS Trust. Her research activities focus on qualitative research in child mental health. For example, recent work has examined family therapy interactions and child mental health assessments. Michelle uses discourse analysis and conversation analysis to look at the social construction of mental health and to explore in detail the interactions between health professionals, parents and children. Her current project is a collection of approximately 42 hours of initial assessment data with 28 families attending their first appointment at the Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service (CAMHS).

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Email: Mjo14@le.ac.uk

Dr Sofie Bager-Charleson

Affiliation: Metanoia Institute

Sofie Bager-Charleson is a Senior Fellow and the Director of Studies (Management) on the MPhil/PhD in Psychotherapy at Metanoia Institute. She has published widely in the field of research reflexivity, including the text book Practice-based Research in Therapy: A Reflexive Approach (Sage, 2014). She is the founder of the Metanoia Research Academy, and the cofounder of IMPACT, a research network at the Metanoia Institute aimed to encourage the generation and exchange of ideas and knowledge within and beyond the Institute. Sofie also practises as a UKCP and BACP registered psychotherapist and supervisor, with a PhD in narrative research into family attachment (Lund University, Sweden). Some of her recent publications are:

Bager-Charleson, S., du Plock, S., McBeath, A (2018 in press) “Therapists have a lot to add to the field of research, but many don’t make it there”. A narrative thematic inquiry into counsellors’ and psychotherapists’ embodied engagement with research. Journal for Language and Psychoanalysis, 7 2018
Bager-Charleson, S., Dewaele, J., Costa, B. & Kasap, Z. (2017) A Multilingual Outlook: Can Awarness-Raising about Multilingualism Affect Therapists’ Practice? A Mixed-Method Evaluation. Language and Psychoanalysis, 2017, 6 (2), 56-75.
Bager-Charleson & Kasap, Z. (2017a) Embodied Situatedness and Emotional Entanglement in Research. Counselling and Psychotherapy Research, Volume 17, Issue 3, pp 190– 200.
Bager-Charleson, S. (2017b) Countertransference in Research: An intersubjective reflexive approach. In Valeri, P. Introduction to Countertransference in Therapeutic Practice: A Myriad of Mirrors pp. 167-185.
Bager-Charleson, S. (2015) Relational reflexivity in therapy-based research’, In Goss, S. and Stevens, C. Making Research Matter. London: Routledge
Bager-Charleson, S. (2014) Practice-based research in therapy – a reflexive approach. London: Sage

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Email: sofie.bager-charleson@metanoia.ac.uk

Dr Sylvia Jaworska

Affiliation: University of Reading

Dr Sylvia Jaworska is an Associate Professor in Applied Linguistics at the Department of English Language and Applied Linguistics at the University of Reading. She is interested in contemporary discourses around health and illness, also in context of food communication and parenting, and explores those areas using linguistic methodologies including corpus linguistics, discourse and narrative analysis. She has published work on discourses of perinatal health and postnatal depression across medical, media and lay contexts as well as pain narratives (please see her publications here). Currently, Sylvia is involved in an interdisciplinary project on the multimodality, perception and understanding of health claims on food packing.

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Dr Martin Pickersgill

Affiliation: University of Edinburgh

Martyn Pickersgill is Wellcome Trust Reader in Social Studies of Biomedicine. Based in Edinburgh Medical School, he conducts research in the social sciences and medical humanities. Martyn’s primary expertise is in the sociology of science, technology and medicine. To date, his research has focused primarily on the social, legal and ethical dimensions of biomedicine and the health professions. In particular, Martyn’s work has considered the sociologies of epigenetics, neuroscience, and mental health (supported through a range of funders, including the AHRC, ESRC, Leverhulme Trust, Newby Trust and Wellcome Trust).

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Email: martyn.pickersgill@ed.ac.uk

Dr Stefan Ecks

Affiliation: University of Edinburgh

Stefan Ecks is co-founder of the Medical Anthropology Programme and a Senior Lecturer in Social Anthropology at Edinburgh University. He works on popular and plural professional concepts of body, health, and medicine in South Asia. Recent research explored the dynamics of the Indian pharmaceutical market, changing ideas of mental health in South Asia, pharmaceutical citizenship and access to health care for poorer people. He held visiting fellowships at the University of California at Berkeley, the Karl Jaspers Centre for Advanced Transcultural Studies at Heidelberg, and the Brocher Foundation at Geneva. He serves on the Editorial Boards of Medical Anthropology Anthropology & Medicine, and Medical Anthropology Quarterly, and as Area Editor for Anthropology, Archaeology, Health, and Ethics of Research for the International Encyclopedia of the Social and Behavioral Sciences, 2nd Edition. Recent publications include the monograph (New York, 2013).

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Email: Stefan.ecks@ed.ac.uk

Paula Greenlees

Affiliation: University of Edinburgh

I am currently a PhD researcher in the psychology department at the University of Edinburgh. I graduated from the Open University with a first class honours degree in psychology in 2016. My research focuses on high demand religious groups which can be defined as those which control the social world and actions of the individual through a strictly imposed framework of rules. How the process of leaving such a group works from a social identity perspective has been an area neglected in social psychology to date. There is a growing body of data available online providing insights into the world of high demand groups which this research will utilise. The overarching aim of my research is to explore exit and identity changes by examining the various discourse constructions at play in the descriptions of those who are or have been involved with these groups. The nature of the data under examination, which contains a level of social interaction, makes it suitable for analysis using discursive psychology. CA and discursive  analysis provide a rigorous, qualitative means to psychologically examine this rarely explored process through the highlighting of category entitlements and ascriptions, moral accountability through the process and epistemic access issues in interaction.

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Email: Paula.greenlees@ed.ac.uk

Dr Paul Dickerson

Affiliation: University of Roehampton

I am interested in conversation and discourse analysis. One strand of this interest involves using conversation and discourse analysis to investigate issues such as communicative impairment (autism and aphasia), interactions with robots and political talk. A second strand of this interest concerns the various debates to be had with and within various aspects of social psychology.

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Email: p.dickerson@roehampton.ac.uk

Dr David C. Giles

Affiliation: University of Winchester

I am Reader in Media Psychology. After working for several years as a freelance music journalist for publications such as NME and the Independent, I studied Psychology at the University of Manchester and did a PhD with the University of Bristol looking at children’s spelling.

Wondering why there was so little research on the influence of the media on human behaviour, I began to develop the field of media psychology, with particular interest in the meanings that celebrity holds for audiences and for the celebrities themselves (Giles, 2000, 2002; Rockwell & Giles, 2009). Since then I have also explored the framing processes of news media (e.g. Giles & Shaw, 2009) and interaction in online mental health communities (Giles, 2006, 2014; Giles & Newbold, 2011, 2013). I have become increasingly interested in the way that social media have transformed the relationship between celebrities and audiences, and my current work looks at the way these developments challenge many of the assumptions of media and audience research (Giles, in prep).

I have an interest in psychological research methods generally, and I set up the journal Qualitative Research in Psychology (Taylor & Francis) with Brendan Gough and Martin Packer, whose first issue appeared in 2004. More recently I have been involved in an international network exploring the development of qualitative methods for studying online communication (MOOD – Microanalysis Of Online Data).

Email: David.Giles@winchester.ac.uk

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Dr Andrew Shepard

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I’m currently employed as a Clinical Lecturer in Psychiatry at the University of Manchester and Higher Trainee in Forensic Psychiatry, North West of England NHS Deanery.
My research interests relate to exploring the boundaries surrounding the understanding of concepts of mental distress – including the expression of personal distress in varying institutional settings and the interaction between different agents in constructing understanding of ‘disorder.’
Affiliation: University of Manchester and North West of England NHS Deanery
Email: andrew.shepherd3@nhs.net

Dr Donna Cox

Affiliation: Open University

Associate Lecturer with the Open University. Research interests are primarily in the area of critical theory and psychoanalytical approaches to textuality and culture with a particular interest in positions of rhetoric inhabited in relation to analysis. Published work has ranged from readings of the early work of Freud, identity and bodily habitation, linguistic negotiation in rap and hip-hop, and the role of phantasy in children’s literature.

Email: d.cox@open.ac.uk

Dr Laura Thompson

Dr Laura Thompson

Affiliation: Birkbeck College

Laura Thompson is a Chartered Psychologist and Lecturer in Social Psychology at Birkbeck College. Her research is applied and ‘real-world’, focusing broadly on health, communication and socio-psychological approaches to occupational psychology. Taking an interdisciplinary approach, Laura draws across a range of methods, in particular conversation analysis, to help solve problems within the health sector, psychiatry and private or public companies. Her research aims to form the foundations for psychological treatments and interventions for individuals with health conditions, including schizophrenia and multiple sclerosis. 

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Dr Billy Clark

Dr Billy Clark

Affiliation: Middlesex University

I am a linguist with research and teaching interests covering a wide range of topics in linguistics and linguistic theory, with a particular focus on various aspects of meaning (semantics and pragmatics). This has included work on lexical and syntactic meaning, semantic change, phatic communication, prosodic meaning, multimodality and stylistics.

Recent publications include a book, Relevance Theory (Cambridge University Press, 2013) and a collection edited with Siobhan Chapman, Pragmatic Literary Stylistics (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014).

I have also worked with a number of groups interested in connections between work at school and at university. I am a member of the UK Linguistics Olympiad committee and, with Marcello Giovanelli and Andrea Macrae, I coordinate the Integrating English project (http://integratingenglish.org)

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Dr Thomas H Bak

Thomas Bak

Affiliation: University of Edinburgh

Born and raised in Cracow, Poland, Dr Thomas H Bak studied medicine in Germany and Switzerland, obtaining his medical doctorate with a thesis on acute aphasias (language disorders caused by brain diseases) at the University of Freiburg (Germany). He worked clinically in psychiatry, neurology and neurosurgery in Basel, Bern, Berlin and Cambridge.

During his time in Cambridge (1995-2006), he established the Clinic for Disorders of Movement and Cognition (DMC). His research addressed in particular the relationship between language, cognition and movement in neurodegenerative diseases and embodied cognition, with a focus on specific deficits in processing verbs/actions and nouns/objects. In this context he developed the Kissing & Dancing Test (KDT) to examine action knowledge. He was also part of the team which developed Addenbrooke’s Cognitive Examination (ACE).

In 2006, he moved to Edinburgh where he continues to work, based at the Anne Rowling Regenerative Neurology Clinic (ARRNC) at the Royal Infirmary (RIE), on the interaction between motor and cognitive functions in patients with dementia. Together with his colleague Sharon Abrahams he developed the Edinburgh Cognitive Assessment (ECAS) for patients in whom dementia is further complicated by motor problems (e.g. weakness, parkinsonism etc). Currently, he is working on Edinburgh Motor Assessment (EMAS), a brief motor screening tool designed specifically for patients with dementia and/or progressive aphasia.

In addition, over the last years he has been focusing increasingly on different aspects of the interaction between bilingualism, language learning and cognition, across the lifespan, in healthy ageing and in brain diseases such as dementia and stroke. He has been working with different populations, in Scotland (Edinburgh, Inner and Outer Hebrides) and across the world (India, Singapore, Malta). From 1 July 2016 he is the strand-leader on Cognition, Health and Well-being on an interdisciplinary, collaborative AHRC grant “Multilingualism: empowering individuals, transforming societies”.

Since 2010, he is the president of the World Federation of Neurology Research Group on Aphasia, Dementia and Cognitive Disorders (WFN RG ADCD). He has teaching experience in seven languages and organised WFN-sponsored teaching courses in cognitive neurology in Europe, Asia and South America (as part of the programme “Cognitive clinics world-wide”).

Main research interests:

  • The interaction between bilingualism and cognitive functions across the lifespan and in brain diseases such as dementia and stroke.
  • Cognitive effects of language learning, in particular in adult learners
  • Embodied cognition and specific deficits in processing of verbs/actions and nouns/objects.
  • The relationship between language, cognition and motor functions in dementia, progressive aphasia and other neurodegenerative diseases
  • Cognitive and motor screening in dementia and neurodegenerative diseases
  • Cross-cultural and cross-linguistic aspects of cognitive evaluation
  • Design and adaptation of cognitive tests to different languages and cultures

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Mrs Christine Erskine

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Affiliation: Washington Center for Psychoanalysis

I am a semi-retired psychoanalyst with an interest in the ongoing development of psychoanalytic theory.  Currently I am exploring overlaps between psychoanalysis and Cognitive Semiotics, a branch of linguistics that is bringing about a “relational turn” in its own field.

Email: cerskine@mindspring.com

Dr Vito Evola

Vito Evola

Affiliation: Universidade Nova de Lisboa

As a researcher, I’m responsible for the Multimodal Communication/Linguistics section of the BlackBox project, investigating performing arts from cognitive and ethnographic perspectives.

Previously, I did post-doctoral research on cognitive semiotics, metaphors, metonymy, gestures and epistemic stance at Humtec – RWTH Aachen University (Germany) with the Natural Media – Gesture lab, teaching Master’s courses in Media Informatics on “Media, Culture and Mind” and “Semiotics and Embodied Cognition in the Digital Age” from 2009-2014. I held a one-year FIIRD fellowship granted by the Foundation for Interreligious and Intercultural Research and Dialogue for research on multimodal cognitive semiotics in relation to religious and spiritual thought at the University of Geneva (Switzerland). I was also lecturer at the University of Palermo (Italy), where my doctoral training began, which was also conducted in the USA at the University of California-Berkeley (Linguistics) as visiting researcher and at Case Western Reserve (Cognitive Science) as visiting scholar.

Broadly, my research lies in the intersection of language, culture and cognition, focusing on multimodal cognitive semiotics and symbolic systems (e.g. religions and religious discourse; performing arts and literature) and the socio-anthropological aspects of conceptual blends. One special research interest of mine is on multimodal metaphors (speech, gesture, cultural artifacts) and how these might be applied in other domains such as in psychotherapy and forensic interviews in order to better understand the epistemic stance of the speaker and how it’s represented in “natural media” (voice, gestures, posture, gaze, etc.). In this sense, I adhere to an embodied and embedded view of the human mind following contemporary cognitive science.

Within the BlackBox research framework, I’m interested in investigating what dancers and other performers might be able to inform science about the relationship between body and cognition and creative processes in general.

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Prof Anna Madill

Affiliation: University of Leeds

Anna Madill  is Deputy Head and Professor in the School of Psychology, University of Leeds and is the psychology contact for, and member of, the Centre for Interdisciplinary Gender Studies. Anna Madill is a Chartered Psychologist, a Chartered Scientist, Fellow of the British Psychological Society and Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences. She Co-Founded and Chaired (2008-11) the British Psychological Society Qualitative Methods in Psychology Section, is Associate Editor of the British Journal of Clinical Psychology and on the editorial boards of the British Journal of Social Psychology, Qualitative Psychology, and Qualitative Research in Psychology. Her interests include qualitative methods, psychoanalysis, Lacan, visual analysis, erotic manga, women’s erotic cultures, health and wellbeing.

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Dr Peter Schneider

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Affiliation: Private Practice & Brooklyn College, The City University of New York

My name is Peter Schneider. I am a psychotherapist with a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from New York Univ. and a certificate in psychoanalysis from the NYU Post-doctoral program. I have been a faculty member at Brooklyn College and Empire State College (SUNY). My article on speech pragmatically and psychotherapy was published in an early number of your journal Language and Psychoanalysis. I have also had articles in Contemporary Psychoanalysis; Psychoanalytic Psychology; and Psychoanalysis and Contemporary Thought. My current interests center on integrating psychoanalytic, Jamesian, and phenomenological views of the self. My e-mail is pschneid@gmail.com

Prof Robert Stolorow

Affiliation: Institute of Contemporary Psychoanalysis

Robert D. Stolorow is a Founding Faculty Member at the Institute of Contemporary Psychoanalysis, Los Angeles, and at the Institute for the Psychoanalytic Study of Subjectivity, New York. Absorbed for more than four decades in the project of rethinking psychoanalysis as a form of phenomenological inquiry, he is the author of World, Affectivity, Trauma: Heidegger and Post-Cartesian Psychoanalysis (Routledge, 2011) and Trauma and Human Existence: Autobiographical, Psychoanalytic, and Philosophical Reflections (Routledge, 2007) and coauthor of eight other books. He received his Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from Harvard in 1970 and his Ph.D. in Philosophy from the University of California at Riverside in 2007.

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Dr Marianna Bolognesi

Marianna Bolognesi

Affiliation: University of Amsterdam

Marianna is a EU Marie Curie awarded postdoc researcher at the UvA. Her research focuses on the differences between visual and verbal metaphors, and taps into the type of knowledge that comes into play when we understand a visual as opposed to a verbal metaphor. To achieve this, she uses quantitative analyses and computational modelling techniques, combined with psychological data. Her current postdoctoral project is called COGVIM (Cognitive Grounding of Visual Metaphor, https://cogvim.org/).

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Dr Angus Macbeth

Angus Macbeth

Affiliation: University of Edinburgh

Angus joined the School of Health in Social Sciences in 2014 as a Lecturer in Clinical Psychology. Prior to this he worked as a Clinical Psychologist with NHS Grampian, working in adult mental health, in the rural setting of Dr Gray’s Hospital, Elgin.  His PhD research was completed at the University of Glasgow with Professor Andrew Gumley, investigating attachment and mentalisation in First Episode Psychosis (FEP). Subsequently, he completed his Doctorate in Clinical Psychology at the University of Glasgow. From 2012 – 2014 he was an NRS Career Research Fellow, funded by NHS Research Scotland; and Honorary Senior Lecturer at the University of Aberdeen, working with the Psychiatry Research Group and the Centre for Rural Health. Angus continues to work with NHS Grampian as an Honorary Principal Clinical Psychologist in Adult Mental Health. He is an Associate Editor for Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice.

Angus is interested in using developmental psychopathology to inform our understanding of risk and resilience in psychiatric disorder, particularly in perinatal mental health. He has a long-standing interest in psychological frameworks, treatment models and the psychological management of psychotic disorders and other complex mental health difficulties including borderline personality disorder and Cluster C personality disorders. Finally, Angus is also interested in using data-linkage strategies for optimising use of routine data, meta-analysis, and the use of small-scale research designs to measure pathways into care and service delivery

Alongside collaborations with University of Edinburgh Angus has external collaborations with the University of Aberdeen, University of Glasgow, University of Copenhagen, University of Southern Denmark, and the Centre for Metacognitive Therapy, Rome.

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Prof Serge Lecours

Serge Lecours

csm_serge-lecours_301x188_01_41abef9d10Academic affiliation: University of Montreal

I essentially try to better understand the links between affect regulation and psychopathology, mainly by studying mental functioning (mentalization, alexithymia). Part of my work bears on the theoretical analysis of these themes, using a mainly psychoanalytical approach that integrates elements of theories of emotion. I also conduct empirical research using a number of methodological strategies: discourse analysis (quantitative and qualitative), creation and use of questionnaires, experimental tasks, etc. I created a grid for verbal elaboration of affect (GÉVA), a verbal measurement of affect mentalization, a central part of many research projects.

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Prof Wolfgang Tschacher

Wolfgang Tschacher

Affiliation: University Bern

Wolfgang Tschacher was born in Stuttgart, Germany, studied psychology at Tübingen University where he received his Ph.D. in 1990. Psychotherapy training in systemic therapy at the Institute of Family Therapy, Munich. Habilitation in psychology and Venia legendi 1996 at University of Bern, Switzerland, professorship in 2002. He currently works at the University Hospital of Psychiatry, where he founded the department of psychotherapy research. His main interests are in quantitative psychotherapy research, time-series methods and experimental psychopathology, with an emphasis on dynamical systems, complexity science, embodied cognition, and phenomena of cognitive self-organization. Organizer of the series of ‘Herbstakademie’ conferences on systems theory in psychology. For a list of publications and conference information see www.upd.unibe.ch or www.embodiment.ch

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Dr Zsofia Demjen

Zsofia Demjen

Affiliation: University College London

Zsófia Demjén is Senior Lecturer in Applied Linguistics at the UCL Centre for Applied Linguistics, University College London. Her research interests include health communication, metaphor, and the intersections of language, mind and health(care). She is author of Sylvia Plath and the Language of Affective States: Written Discourse and the Experience of Depression (2015, Bloomsbury), co-editor of The Routledge Handbook of Metaphor and Language (2017) and her work has appeared in the Journal of Pragmatics, Applied Linguistics, Communication & Medicine, Medical Humanities, and Discourse Studies among others.

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Prof Lisa Mikesell

Lisa Mikesell

Affiliation: Rutgers – State University of New Jersey

I use mixed methods to investigate the communication and social practices used to negotiate interactions in a variety of health and mental health contexts. My scholarship consists of three intertwining threads guided by my interest in patient engagement in real world contexts. The first thread is situated in the community and reconceptualizes the notion of communicative competence by centering on what patients do in their everyday lives. Much of this work examines the situated communication practices of individuals diagnosed with neurological and psychiatric disorders to provide a grounded perspective on everyday functioning and community participation.

The second thread is situated in the clinic and is informed by my work in the community reconceptualizing competence. I also examine clinical work practices and clinical reasoning to consider applications of patient-centered constructs such as shared decision making. These first two threads weave together a situated understanding of the “everyday-ness” of an individual’s functioning – which is often neglected or misunderstood – with an understanding of what happens in the clinic.

The final thread considers the societal need for patient participation in the collective sense, namely how to reach and work with patient communities to pose more relevant research questions and develop more sensitive research strategies to better serve patient populations and better assist caregivers and clinicians. My work informs our understanding of best practices, intervention development and implementation and therefore contains a strong applied component, particularly to inquiry in health services.

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Prof Panos Athanasopoulos

Prof Panos Athanasopoulos

 

Affiliation: Lancaster University

I work in the areas of experimental psycholinguistics, experimental cognitive linguistics, bilingual cognition, linguistic and cultural relativity, first, second and additional language learning.

The main questions that guide my research concern language-driven human cognition and can be summarised as follows:
1. To what extent do speakers with different cultural and linguistic backgrounds think and perceive the world differently?
2. To what extent does additional language learning transform the way we perceive the world?
Recent research programmes have looked at the effects of colour terminology on colour categorical perception, the relationship between grammatical aspect and perception of goal-oriented motion events, the lexicalization of path, manner and causation of motion and motion event cognition, the effects of grammatical gender on object perception, the count/mass noun distinction and the construal of individuation, in populations such as monolingual, bilingual, and multilingual adults, child L1 and L2 acquirers, instructed and naturalistic foreign language learners, and involving speakers of languages such as Afrikaans, Arabic, English, French, German, Greek, Japanese, Sotho, Spanish, Swati, Swedish, Tswana, Xhosa, Zulu.

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Dr Sheryl Prentice

Sheryl Prentice

Affiliation: Lancaster University

Sheryl Prentice (PhD, Lancaster, UK) is currently a researcher on the Native Language Influence Detection 6 project at Lancaster University, UK. She is a member of Lancaster University’s Corpus Approaches to Social Science Centre (CASS) and the University Centre for Computer Corpus Research on Language (UCREL). She specializes in the psycho-linguistic study of violent extremism from a multidisciplinary perspective, particularly via the use of automated approaches. She has published papers on the use of corpus linguistic methods in the study of online counter(terrorism) and radicalization, and nationalism.

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Prof Nina Jessica Lester

Nina Jessica Lester

Affiliation: Indiana University

Dr. Jessica Nina Lester is an Assistant Professor of Inquiry Methodology in the School of Education at Indiana University, US. She teaches research methods courses and also focuses much of her research on the study and development of qualitative methodologies. She situates much of her substantive research within discourse studies and disability studies, with a particular focus on education and mental health contexts. Dr. Lester is the co-editor of The Palgrave handbook of child mental health: Discourse and conversation studies and The Palgrave handbook of adult mental health: Discourse and conversation studies. She has most recently published in journals such as Qualitative Inquiry, Patient Education & Counseling, and Discourse Studies.

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Prof Michael Hazelton

Mike Hazelton

Affiliation: University of Newcastle Australia

Professor Mike Hazelton has worked in different parts of Australia – New South, Western Australia and Tasmania, and has had extensive experience leading schools of nursing at the University of Tasmania, Curtin University and the University of Newcastle. He is Honorary Director of the Halla /Newcastle Centre for Problem Based Learning, Cheju Halla University, Republic of Korea and was Visiting Professor in the School of Healthcare, University of Leeds between May and September 2010.

Professor Hazelton’s clinical work as Professor of Mental Health Nursing has included involvement in various types of cognitive behaviour therapy. For instance, he participated as both an individual therapist and group skills therapist in the delivery of dialectical behaviour therapy (DBT) for borderline personality disorder in the Centre for Psychotherapy, Hunter New England Area Health Service between 2005 and 2010. He was also involved in a program providing group-based cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) for depression to clients referred by local general practitioners in the Newcastle/Hunter region in 2006 and 2009. Professor Hazelton is also an accredited Mental Health First Aid Master Trainer and has provided mental health first aid training to students, university staff and community members since 2009. Many of Professor Hazelton’s research publications and presentations reflect his ongoing commitment to clinical work and health professional education.

Professor Hazelton has a research background in both qualitative and quantitative methods, has published widely on mental health and mental health nursing and has undertaken consultancies for various governments, both Commonwealth and State in Australia. A particular area of focus in his work is on discourses of mental health, illness and recovery. Professor Hazelton is a past Editor of the International Journal of Mental Health Nursing and is currently a member of the Editorial Advisory Committee of the Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry. To date he has supervised 16 PhD students to successful completion; been the recipient of a number of awards for mental health nursing research; and in 2003 was made a Life Member of the Australian College of Mental Health Nurses, the highest honour awarded by that professional organisation.

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Dr Dennis Tay

Dennis Tay

Affiliation: Hong Kong Polytechnic University

I am Assistant Professor at the Department of English, the Hong Kong Polytechnic University. I work on linguistic and communication patterns in mental healthcare discourse including psychotherapy, counseling, and public health promotion, and enjoy collaborative research with mental healthcare practitioners. I have a keen interest in the use, management of, and response to metaphors in psychotherapy across different cultural contexts. Relevant publications include a monograph (Metaphor in Psychotherapy. A Descriptive and Prescriptive Analysis. Amsterdam and Philadelphia: John Benjamins) and articles in both linguistics and psychology journals.

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Dr Omar Gelo

Omar Gelo

Affiliation: Sigmund Freud University Vienna and Università del Salento

Dr. Omar Gelo graduated in Psychology at the University of Urbino (Italy) in 2000. He earned his Ph.D. at the University of Ulm (Germany) in 2007, where he also worked as a research assistant. In 2007 he begun to work as assistant professor at the Department of Psychotherapy Science of the Sigmund Freud University Vienna (Austria). In 2008 he became Assistant Professor for Dynamic Psychology at the Department of History, Society and Human Studies of the University of Salento (Italy). Since 2014 he is Associate Professor for Dynamic Psychology at the same department where he since then director of the Bachelor and Master Program in Psychology. Since 2008 he works as consultant of the Sigmund Freud University Vienna (Austria), where he also the director of the International Ph.D. Program in Psychotherapy Science at the Sigmund Freud University Vienna (Austria).

His research interests concern: (a) the epistemological reflection on the scientific status of psychotherapy and psychological intervention; (b) the methodological reflection on the application of quantitative, qualitative and mixed methods in psychotherapy and clinical research; (c) the empirical investigation of the psychotherapeutic process in different therapeutic schools (comparative process-outcome research); (d) psychotherapy integration; and (e) the application of dynamic systems theory to the study of psychotherapy; (e) the investigation of psychotherapeutic development. He recently co-edited the volume “Psychotherapy Research: Foundations, Process, and Outcome” (Springer, Vienna).

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Dr Ethel Quayle

Ethel Quayle

Affiliation: University of Edinburgh

I trained as a clinical psychologist at Queen’s University Belfast before completing my doctorate at Surrey University. During this time I was employed in a variety of clinical positions in adult mental health in the UK and Ireland before joining University College Cork in 1995. In Cork I was responsible for post-graduate training in CBT (MA and HDip) as well as director of the COPINE Project. As a practitioner I had worked with both sex offenders and their victims and for the last fourteen years have been working in the area of Internet abuse images, collaborating internationally with government and non-government agencies. The COPINE project took as its focus children made vulnerable through the new technologies.

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Dr Laura A. Cariola

Laura Cariola

Affiliation: University of Edinburgh

My research focuses on the intersection between language and clinical psychology, including both qualitative and quantitative research approaches a) to inform the development of policy guidelines and interventions to improve provision of healthcare, and b) to explore media presentations of mental health.

As a part of ongoing work that explores mental health in public and medical discourses, I have obtained a Research Fellowship at the Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities where I am focussing upon ‘Presentations of complex mental illness in media and medical discourses: A corpus‐assisted study’. Collaborators include academics across the College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences, such as clinical psychology, counselling and psychotherapy, anthropology, social work and medicine. My mentor is Prof. Matthias Schwannauer, Head of Clinical and Health Psychology at the School of Health in Social Science at the University of Edinburgh.

I am also the co-founding editor (together with Dr. Andrew Wilson) of the journal ‘Language and Psychoanalysis’. The ‘Language and Mind Network’ which aims to bring together individuals with an interest in the intersection of language and psychology, including psychotherapy, clinical psychology and the humanities, and thus to encourage dialogue and collaboration.

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Dr Jonathan Wyatt

Jonathan Wyatt

Affiliation: University of Edinburgh

Jonathan Wyatt is a senior lecturer at the University of Edinburgh. His article with Beatrice Allegranti, ‘Witnesing Loss: A Materialist Feminist Account’, won the 2015 Norman K. Denzin Qualitative Research Award. His recent books include On (writing) families: Autoethnographies of presence and absence, love and loss, co-edited with Tony Adams and published by Sense.

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Prof Matthias Schwannauer

Matthias Schwannauer

Affiliation : University of Edinburgh

Matthias Schwannauer graduated with first degrees in Philosophy and Psychology from the University of Marburg in 1994. In 1998 he completed his applied clinical psychology training at the University of Marburg with internships in Marburg, Berlin and Edinburgh. His first position as a qualified clinical psychologist was in the Adolescent Mental Health Services in Greater Glasgow NHS. He moved to NHS Lothian and the University of Edinburgh in January 2000. During this time he was able to carry out his PhD research into psychological interventions for bipolar disorders.  This research involved the implementation of a randomised controlled trial of Cognitive Interpersonal Therapy and an investigation of the role of interpersonal and cognitive factors in mood regulation in bipolar disorders and the recovery process.

Since 2009 he is Head of Clinical & Health Psychology and Programme Director for the Doctorate in Clinical Psychology training programme at the University of Edinburgh. He is further a Consultant Clinical Psychologist in the Early Psychosis Support Service at CAMHS Lothian.

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Dr Billy Lee

Billy Lee

Affiliation: University of Edinburgh

My research investigates “lived experience”. I am interested in how our personal histories, bodies, culture, and existential situation influence how we experience ourselves and other people, and how we interpret, avoid and express feeling and being. I use Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis to conduct experience-near interviews with special populations. My current projects include i) therapeutic listening and communication; ii) life transitions and identity development; iii) and emotional communication and perception

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Dr Lorena Georgiadou

Lorena Georgadiou

Affiliation : University of Edinburgh

Lorena Georgiadou is Lecturer in Counselling, Psychotherapy and Applied Social Sciences at the University of Edinburgh. She is interested in the role of linguistic and cultural diversity in relational contexts such as Higher Education, counselling and research practice.

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Marie-Luise Alder

Marie-Luise Alder

Affiliation : International Psychoanalytic University Berlin

I am a doctoral student of Humboldt-University Berlin and member of the doctoral program PSAID at International Psychoanalytic University (IPU). At IPU I am research assistant at the CEMPP Project (Conversation analysis of empathy in psychotherapy process research).

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Dr Andrew Geeves

Andrew Geeves
thumbnail_Andrew%20Geeves

Andrew Geeves

Affiliation : Macquarie University

Dr Andrew Geeves is a Sydney-based researcher with an interest in psychoanalysis, the experience of expert performance and the emotions involved in this experience, especially for musicians. He graduated from a PhD in Psychology from Macquarie University, Sydney in 2012 in which he drew on semi-structured interviews and in-depth fieldwork to build a grounded theory of the experience of music performance for professional musicians. Since then, he has gained experience working as a music performance coach and researcher with Opera Australia and as a lecturer and tutor at Macquarie University in addition to conducting performance-based research with sportspeople. He is currently nearing the end of his training to become a registered psychologist and plans to pursue psychoanalytic training in the future. He dreams of residing in New York City and achieving a balance in his work between research, teaching, writing and practicing as an analyst.

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Prof Michael Buchholz

Michael Buchholz

Affiliation : International Psychoanalytic University Berlin

Prof. Dr. Michael B. Buchholz, Dipl.-Psych., Professor for Social Psychology at the International Psychoanalytic University (IPU), Berlin (Germany), head of the Dissertation Program at IPU. PhD in Psychoanalysis 1980 (Frankfurt), Habilitation in Social Sciences 1990 in Göttingen; Psychoanalyst and Training Analyst in the German Psychoanalytic Society. Editorial board of “System Familie”, “Psychotherapie und Sozialwissenschaft”, “Psychosozial”, “International Forum of Psychoanalysis”, „Language and Psychoanalysis“. More than 150 publications. Qualitative studies: analysis of a 30 session short-term therapy (1996), scenarios of contact (1997), sexual offenders in group therapy (2008), empathy conversations in psychotherapy.

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Robert K. Beshara, M.F.A.

Affiliation : University of West of Georgia

Robert Beshara is a doctoral candidate in Consciousness and Society at the University of West Georgia, where he researches the ‘psychology’ of Islamophobia in the United States using critical theory and qualitative research. He has taught the following courses at the undergraduate level: Personal Relationships and Introduction to General Psychology. He has presented his academic work at international conferences in: Key West, FL; Atlanta, GA; Vienna, Austria; Oxford, UK; and Berkeley, CA. And he has published on diverse topics, such as cinema, consciousness, the Internet, emotions, and psychoanalysis. Furthermore, he is a fine artist with experiences in theatre, music, and film.

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Dr Lubie Alatriste

Lubie Alatriste

Affiliation : NYC College of Technology, City University of New York (CUNY)

Lubie G. Alatriste is associate professor in the Department of English, City University of New York. She currently teaches second language writing, composition, and courses in literacy and linguistics. Her research focuses on genre teaching and transfer as well as critical discourse. Most recently she has developed a framework for application of discourse research results in professional practice. Her most recent publications appeared in Journal of Second Language Writing, Idiom, and NYSTESOL Journal. Her most recent book is an edited collection by Multilingual Matters, UK.

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