Hovi (ed), “Pentecostalism Around the Baltic Sea”

Hovi, Tuija (ed). 2015. Pentecostalism Around the Baltic Sea. Approaching Religion 5(1) (open-access issue).

Table of Contents

Editorial: Pentecostalism around the Baltic Sea.  Tuija Hovi, Ruth Illman

(Re-)Placing Pentecostalism: Swedish Mission and the idea of the Baltic.  Simon Michael Coleman

Research on Pentecostalism in Sweden.  Jan-Åke B Alvarsson

Pentecostal currents and individual mobility: visiting church services in Stockholm County.  Jessica Moberg

Conversion and the transformation of culture in the Finnish Pentecostal movement. Teemu T. Mantsinen

Charismatic Christianity and Pentecostal churches in Estonia from a historical perspective.  Ringo Ringvee

From Pentecost to ‘inner healing’: Religious change and Pentecostal developments in the post-socialist Lithuanian Catholic milieu. Saulius Matulevicius

Localising and accultering the global: The Healing Rooms prayer service network in Finland.  Tuija Hovi

Review ARticle: Pentecostalism in Finland: The Precarious beginning.  Nils G. Holm

 

Ketola et al., “New communities of worship”

Ketola, Kimmo, Tuomas Martikainen, Hanna Salomäki.  2014. New communities of worship: Continuities and mutations among religious organizations in Finland.  Social Compass 61(2): 153-171.

Abstract: The authors provide a summary of three key developments that have brought change to the field of religious organizations in Finland: the emergence of new Lutheran communities (the St Thomas Mass, the so-called Nokia Revival and the fundamentalist Luther Foundation Finland); Ashtanga yoga as a form of spirituality; and the spread of migrant religious communities. The article sets these developments in the context of late modern communal belonging and discusses how religious communities have been transforming over the last two to three decades in Finland.

Kaufman, “A Plea for Ethnographic Methods”

Kaufman, Tone Stangeland.  2014.  “A Plea for Ethnographic Methods and a Spirituality of Everyday Life in the Study of Christian Spirituality: A Norwegian Case of Clergy Spirituality.” Spiritus: A Journal of Christian Spirituality 14(1): 94-102.

Excerpt: What counts as “real spirituality” or “real pastoral spirituality”? What can be sustainable sources of spiritual nourishment for clergy and others who are employed by the church? These questions might call for a wider understanding of pastoral spirituality than has traditionally been the case, and also for the willingness to look for such spirituality outside the explicitly “religious or spiritual sphere.” The quotes above are taken from open ended, in-depth interviews with ordained pastors in my Norwegian, Lutheran context. The twenty-one strategically sampled interviewees of this study on clergy spirituality all served as pastors in the Church of Norway (CofN) at the time they were interviewed.

At the outset of my research, my focus was primarily the contemplative or devotional practices of the clergyHowever, during the analysis, the salience and significance of everyday practices related to children and family life began emerging as a pattern worth exploring more in depth. This is a discovery that I would have probably not reached had I only studied classical texts written by spiritual figures such as Julian of Norwich, St. John of the Cross, or Evelyn Underhill.

This essay, then, has a twofold purpose; one material and one methodological. Materially, it makes a plea for the significance of an everyday spirituality not only for lay (people), but also for clergy, at least in non-Catholic traditions. This might also apply to lay leaders and deacons in Catholic contexts. Methodologically, I want to suggest that an ethnographic approach might enrich the study of Christian spirituality by expanding the sources (or data) to be explored, and by challenging or nuancing existing categories of the field. The ethnographic lens gives access to the spiritual experiences of contemporary people who have not written—or are not in the position to write—spiritual texts themselves.

Pons “The Anthropology of Christianity in the Faroe Islands”

Pons, Christophe (2011) “The Anthropology of Christianity in the Faroe Islands: What the fringes of the Faroese religious configuration have to say about Christianity,” in Firouz Gaini (ed)Among the Islanders of the North: An Anthropology of the Faroe Islands. Tórshavn: Faroe University Press

Excerpt: “At the beginnings of the 1980s, in the remote villages of the small North Atlantic archipelago of the  Faroe Islands, some people started talking about Jesus in a different way. They said that Jesus was with them all the time, that he was their fellow, their best friend, that he opened their eyes and their hearts. They claimed that Jesus saved them by offering them freedom and that they were dong some new kind of evangelization in a proselytical and aggressive way. At first the Faroese people found this a little strange. But with time, the Friends of Jesus – as we shall call them – became part of the Faroese religious landscape . . . “