Auvinen-Pöntinen and Jørgensen (eds), “Mission and Money”

Auvinen- Pöntinen, Mari-Anna and Jonas Adelin Jørgensen, eds.  2016.  Mission and Money: Christian Mission in the Context of Global Inequalities.  Leiden: Brill.

Publisher’s Description: Mission and Money; Christian Mission in the Context of Global Inequalities offers academic discussion about the mission of the Church in the context of contemporary economic inequalities globally, challenging the reader to reconsider mission in the light of existing poverty, and investigating how economic structures could be challenged in the light of ethical and spiritual considerations. The book includes contributions on the subjects of poverty and inequality from the theologians, economists and anthropologists who gave keynote presentations at the European Missiological Conference (IAMS Europe) that took place in April 2014 in Helsinki, Finland. This conference was a major step forward in terms of discussion between missiologists and economists on global economic structures and their influence on human dignity.

Contents:

Introduction – Jonas Adelin Jørgensen and Mari-Anna Auvinen-Pöntinen
Introducing Authors

Part I
A Challenge of Theological-Missiological Reflection on Money and Mobility in the Globalizing World – Veli-Matti Kärkkäinen

Part II
Ethics and Global Economics – Vesa Kanniainen
Asian Perspectives on Global Economic Inequality – Felix Wilfred
Christian Mission in a World under the Grip of an Unholy Trinity: Inequality, Poverty and Unemployment – Tinyiko Sam Maluleke
Poverty and Power: African Challenges to Christian Mission – Gerrie ter Haar
The Mission of the Church amidst European Social and Economic Crisis: The Case of Greece – Evi Voulgaraki-Pissina
Interreligious Liberation Theologies, Money and Just Relations – Ulrich Duchrow
Economic Development and Christian Mission: A Perspective from History of Mission – Jonathan J. Bonk

Part III
Mission and Money in Two Recent Mission Documents: The WCC’s Together towards Life and Pope Francis’s Evangelii Gaudium – Stephen Bevans
Mission and Money—Mapping the Field – Mika Vähäkangas

Young and Seitz, ed, “Asia in the Making of Christianity”

Young, Richard Fox and Jonathan A. Seitz, eds. 2013. Asia in the Making of Christianity: Conversion, Agency, and Indigeneity, 1600s to the Present. London: Brill.

Contributors: Richard Fox Young, Jonathan A. Seitz, Nola Cooke, Richard Burden, Joseph Tse-Hei Lee, La Seng Dingrin, Erik de Maaker, Sipra Mukherjee, Gregory Vanderbilt, Jonas Adelin Jorgensen, Chad M. Bauman, Franklin Rausch, Rhonda Semple, Matthias Frenz, Edwin Zehner

Publisher’s Description: Drawing on first person accounts, Asia in the Making of Christianity studies conversion in the lives of Christians throughout Asia, past and present. Fifteen contributors treat perennial questions about conversion: continuity and discontinuity, conversion and communal conflict, and the politics of conversion. Some study individuals (An Chunggŭn of Korea, Liang Fa of China, Nehemiah Goreh of India), while others treat ethnolinguistic groups or large-scale movements. Converts sometimes appear as proto-nationalists, while others are suspected of cultural treason. Some transition effortlessly from leadership in one religious community into Christian ministry, while others re-convert to new forms of Christianity. The accounts collected here underscore the complexity of conversion, balancing individual agency with broader social trends and combining micro- with macrocontextual approaches

Farrell, “Short-Term Mission to Global Discipleship”

Farrell, B. Hunter. 2013. From Short-Term Mission to Global Discipleship: A Peruvian Case Study. Missiology 41(2):163-178.

Abstract: This article is a case study of how short-term missions in Peru were transformed into long-term involvement in a way that contributed to the transformation of the host community, the missioners, and their understanding of God’s mission. A complex environmental conflict in a highly polluted city in the Andes Mountains provided the context where a Christian mission network engaged more than 90 U.S. and 40 Peruvian Christians to transform short-term missions into a platform for long-term engagement and peaceful change.

Ybarrola, “Anthropology, Diasporas, and Mission”

Ybarrolo, Steven. 2012. Anthropology, Diasporas, and Mission. Mission Studies 29(1):79-94.

Abstract: In recent years the field of diaspora missiology has been developing within mission studies, receiving important recognition at the Third Lausanne Congress on World Evangelization in 2010. This is an interdisciplinary field of study, bringing together the trialogue of theology, anthropology, and mission. This article explores how the longstanding interest within the discipline of anthropology in the study of migration has evolved since the 1990s into the study of diasporas and transnationalism. The author then presents ways in which this focus in anthropology can assist in the research and study of diaspora missiology. He concludes by discussing ways in which the study of diasporas and Christianity can bring together both anthropologists and missiologists in a cooperative effort to research the sociocultural dynamics at work in understanding this phenomenon, thereby lessening the traditional animosity between these two disciplines.