“Discourse Analysis Workshop” at University of Edinburgh, School of Health in Social Science

There will be a series of workshops with an focus on “discourse analysis in health and social science”.
  
ALL ARE WELCOME but places are limited. Please contact me directly laura.cariola@ed.ac.uk to reserve your place for the workshops. No prior knowledge of discourse analysis is required, but an interest of using qualitative approaches to health-related data is necessary.
 
Workshop 1 – 9thth October 2017, 3-5pm
Workshop 2 – 30th October 2017, 3-5pm
Workshop 3 – 20th November 2017, 3-5pm

Location: Institute for Advanced Studies in the Humanities
 

“‘I was seeing more of her’: international counselling trainees’ perceived benefits of intercultural clinical practice” by Lorena Georgiadou

Abstract

Counsellor education in Britain is steadily turning into a multicultural environment. The limited relevant literature focuses on the challenges that ‘culturally different’ and international trainees may encounter. The aim of this paper is to elucidate a rarely exposed aspect of international counselling trainees’ training experience, namely, the benefits they identify in practising across languages and cultures during placement. The illustration of this positive perspective is pertinent to the profession, as it expands existing knowledge on international trainees’ experience of clinical practice and it challenges the prevailing conceptualisation of this situation as potentially problematic. It is argued that a shift towards a more holistic understanding of this population’s counselling experiences is likely to have particularly useful implications for counsellor education and the profession more broadly.

http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/03069885.2014.996735?journalCode=cbjg20

 

 

“‘My language thing … is like a big shadow always behind me’: International counselling trainees’ challenges in beginning clinical practice” By Lorena Georgiadou

Abstract

Background: While counsellor education becomes increasingly culturally diverse, little is known about international trainees’ experiences of training. Objective: The present study explores one aspect of training, namely clinical practice from the perspective of international, non-native speaking trainees. In particular, this paper focuses on the challenges this group encounters when practicing in a second language. Methodology: Semi-structured interviews with four non-native English-speaking trainees were conducted and analysed following the principles of interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA). Results: Findings suggest that participants encounter practical difficulties related to their non-native/foreign identity in practice, such as problems with articulate self-expression and understanding the client’s speech. These difficulties generate anxiety and impact on the trainees’ confidence. Conclusions and implications for counsellor training: This study elucidates language as a fundamental aspect of culture, and identifies second language use as a significant source of difference in counselling practice. This paper highlights the need for attention to linguistic diversity and for appropriate support during counsellor education. This will improve international trainees’ experiences of training, but also enhance all trainees’ understanding of difference, resulting in better service provision for the community.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1080/14733145.2013.770896/abstract

Workshops on “Corpus Linguistics and Content Analysis”

In May and June 2017, the School of Health and Social Science at the University of Edinburgh offers a series of workshops on the use of corpus linguistics and content analysis to explore language data. Such quantitative approaches to language analysis are carried out using software and can provide in-depth insight on language use and word patterns that would be too difficult and too time-consuming to identify using qualitative methods.

“Borderline States of Mind and destructive Feelings: A diagnosis for our times?” 5th May 2017

ASPD in Context — Cross Disciplinary Perspectives on ‘anti-social personality disorder’
Borderline States of Mind and Destructive Feelings: A diagnosis for our times?
The Institute of Group Analysis, London NW3 5BY

“The Nuances of Metaphor Theory for Constructivist Psychotherapy” by Dennis Tay

AbstractConstructivist Psychology journal cover

Constructivist psychotherapy and contemporary metaphor theory, as part of the neighboring fields of psychology and linguistics, share fundamental assumptions rooted in constructivist philosophy. There has been much cross-disciplinary discussion of how our inclination toward metaphors translates into an important meaning-making resource in therapy and other domains of professional practice, such as education. Nevertheless, more reciprocal effort is needed to (a) show practitioners the relevance of nuanced aspects of metaphor theory and linguistic analysis that may evade their attention, and (b) sensitize linguists toward practice-driven factors in their analyses. This article attempts the first of these tasks by identifying and exemplifying four such aspects: (a) source domains at different experiential levels, (b) variable source-target relationships in discourse, (c) metaphorical processes at higher levels of analysis, and (d) discursive and communicative grounding of metaphor. I suggest how they might provide pertinent insights and future directions for interpreting, analyzing, and working with metaphors in psychotherapy.

Link to original article

“Saying good goodbyes to your clients: A functional analytic psychotherapy (FAP) perspective” by Mavis Tsai, Tore Gustafsson, Jonathan Kanter, Mary Plummer Loudon & Robert J. Kohlenberg

Abstract

Functional analytic psychotherapy (FAP) promotes client growth by shaping clients’ daily life problems that also show up in session with their therapists. FAP therapists create evocative contexts within therapy that afford clients the opportunity to practice, refine, and be reinforced for new, more adaptive behaviors which then can be generalized into their outside lives. In FAP, the termination process will vary from client to client depending on the nature of the client’s problems and targets. For many clients, the process can be a rich, multifaceted, final opportunity to evoke, reinforce, and promote generalization of clients’ in-session improvements, particularly improvements related to vulnerable self-expression in the service of intimate and close relationships. By making explicit agreements at the outset of therapy to participate in an intentional termination process, and by later providing an evocative structure for ending therapy with vulnerable emotional expression, clients have the opportunity to develop more adaptive behaviors in the context of relationship endings which can be a painful part of the human experience. Equipped with the skills of open-hearted communication developed from an authentic relationship with their therapist, clients can leave therapy on a trajectory of further growth in interpersonal connection and living more boldly.

Link to original article

“Formulations in Psychotherapy Admission Interviews and the Conversational Construction of Diagnosis” by Juan Eduardo Bonnin

In this article, we contribute to understanding the interactional aspects of making clinical diagnosis in mental health care. We observe that therapists, during the “problem presentation” sequence in clinical encounters, often use a specific form of diagnostic formulations to elicit more diagnostically relevant information. By doing so, they often substitute one type of verb with another, following a diagnostic hypothesis. Specifically, in interviews that arrive at a diagnosis of neurosis, therapists formulate with behavioral verbal processes; in interviews that arrive at a diagnosis of psychosis, they do so with material ones. Such formulations often prove useful to define clinical diagnoses. They can, however, also be dangerous in that they may favor the therapist’s agenda over the patient’s. Our analysis helps therapists not only better understand the diagnostic process but also reflect upon their own use of diagnostic formulations and become aware of the clinical effects of their interactional performance.

Link to original article

“Addressing Acculturative Stress in Psychotherapy A Case Study of a Latino Man Overcoming Cultural Conflicts and Stress Related to Language Use” by Calica A. Torres, Martha R. Crowther & Stanley Brodsky

Abstract

To foster engagement in treatment and improve therapeutic outcomes for immigrant clients, it is important for therapists to integrate cultural values and to recognize the psychological stressors faced as immigrants learn to adapt and assimilate changes associated with moving to a new country. This case study describes the integration of cultural values when working with immigrant Latino clients who are at an increased risk of experiencing acculturative stress as a result of moving to the United States and having limited English knowledge. The integration of cultural values of familismo and personalismo are also discussed as it related to case conceptualization and treatment process. Finally, the current case provides information about conducting therapy in two languages and transitioning from Spanish to English as part of acculturation process while also addressing multifaceted aspects involved when working with Latino clients.

Link to original article

“Multilingualism and psychotherapy: exploring multilingual clients’ experiences of language practices in psychotherapy” by Louise Rolland, Jean-Marc Dewaele & Beverley Costa

Abstract

This study investigates bi- and multilingual clients’ self-reported language practices in counselling and psychotherapy. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected through an international web survey inviting adults who had experienced one-to-one therapy to describe their experiences. Analysis of responses by 109 multilingual clients revealed that clients did not always have an opportunity to discuss their multilingualism with therapists, and for some this inhibited their language switching. Others were assertive in their language choices, or benefited from working with a therapist who was either bilingual or skilled at creating an inclusive linguistic environment. Very few reported two main therapy languages, while nearly two thirds of participants reported short code-switches. These happened occasionally within sessions and were typically linked to difficulties in translation, expressing emotion, accessing memories or quotation. Over a third of respondents used a second or additional language as their main therapy language, nearly half of whom reported never switching to their first language in sessions, despite some using it daily for inner speech. The implications for therapy and further research are discussed, including the role of the therapist in inviting the client’s multiple languages into the therapeutic frame.

Link to original article

Bilingualism as a Tool in Psychotherapy by Daria Diakonova-Curtis

Living in an increasingly globalised world where people move between countries and cultures influences the psychotherapeutic process in many ways. In a recent article for “The Society of Advancement of Psychotherapy”, Daria Diakonova-Curtis explores the implications of being a bilingual psychotherapist, encounters with bilingual clients and current research within this field. To read more about bilingualism in psychotherapy, follow the link to the original article…

Link to original article

New issue of “Language and Psychoanalysis” Volume 6 Issue 1 Spring/Summer 2017

We are very pleased to inform you that Volume 6 Issue 1 of the open access journal “Language and Psychoanalysis” has gone online.

http://www.language-and-psychoanalysis.com/

This issue includes the following articles:

Robert D. Stolorow, Ph.D. & George E. Atwood, Ph.D.   The Phenomenology of Language and the Metaphysicalizing of the Real

Fernanda Carrá-Salsberg, Ph.D.   A Psychoanalytic Look into The Effects of Childhood and Adolescent Migration in Eva Hoffman’s Lost in Translation

David Hafner, Ph.D.   An Introduction to the Transference Unconscious 

Rina Stahl Freedman, Ph.D.   Cross-Cultural Treatment Issues in Psychoanalysis      

Giuseppe Iurato, Ph.D.   Book Review. Reading Italian Psychoanalysis

Anonymous Author, M. A.   Book Review. Language Disorders in Children and Adolescents  

 

The journal “Language and Psychoanalysis” is also currently accepting manuscripts for the next issue in Autumn-Winter 2017.

Manuscript submission due date: 30th September 2017

Language and Psychoanalysis. Special issue on Conversational Analysis

screen-shot-2017-01-15-at-15-51-46Our guest editors Prof. Michael. B. Buchholz and Prof. Horst Kächele have put together a special issue on “Conversational Analysis in Psychotherapy Process Research”. The special issue has excellent contributions that were originally part of the panel at the 47th SPR International Annual Meeting in Jerusalem, Israel. The panel was extremely successful and produced fruitful discussions on positioning conversational analysis in the field of psychotherapy research.

The contributions of the special issue are:

http://www.language-and-psychoanalysis.com/issue/current

 

“Communication and Psychotherapy” New Regular Special Issue – Call for Papers

“Communication and Psychotherapy” is a new regular special issue featured by the journal “Language and Psychoanalysis”. The special issue welcomes original contributions to further understand of communication and language in psychotherapeutic processes. It focusses on a wide range of approaches to counselling and psychotherapy, including person-centred, CBT, integrative and holistic therapies.

Any relevant manuscripts with an emphasis on communication and language in counselling and psychotherapy will be considered. The journal also publishes short research reports, book reviews, interviews, obituaries, and readers’ comments.

Manuscripts should be send to the managing editor Dr. Laura A. Cariola laura.cariola@ed.ac.uk
Manuscript submission due date: 31st March 2017

communication-and-psychotherapy

ISSN: 2399-5041

“Language and Psychotherapy – Knowledge Transfer Group”

We will be hosting a series of seminars relevant to the topic of language in psychotherapy and patient-centred communication. The aims of the seminars are to transfer knowledge that complements the development of professionals (e.g., academics, practitioners and post-graduate students) working in the field of counselling, psychotherapy, clinical psychology, nursing, psychology, education and other disciplines with an interest in the use of language in therapy and patient-centred communication. The seminars will be also reaching out to NHS staff and therapists working across all three sectors: voluntary, statutory and private.

The seminars will encourage collaborative work and the development of skills for language-based psychotherapy research, and also to develop greater awareness of person-centred communicative processes within the psychotherapeutic context.

ALL ARE WELCOME but spaces are limited. Please contact laura.cariola@ed.ac.uk to reserve your place for the KE seminars. All seminars will take place at the University of Edinburgh, School of Health in Social Science, Teviot Place, Old Medical School, Doorway 6, Edinburgh EH8 9AG.

10th November 3-5pm, Room 4.01 “Second-language use in psychotherapy” by Dr. Lorena Georgiadou

19th December 3-5pm, Room 4.01 “Subjectivity in psychotherapy from a perspective of enlightenment and critical rationalism” by Prof. Matthias Schwannauer

 24th January 2-4pm, Room 4.01 “Power and narratives in psychotherapy” by Mr. Seamus Prior

16th February 4.30-5.45pm, Room 4.01 “Autoethnography: a ‘close up’ research approach” Dr. Jonathan Wyatt

 9th March 3-5pm, Room 4.01 “Phenomenology and minority experiences” by Dr. Billy Lee

 6th April, 3-5pm Room 4.01 “Metaphors in psychotherapy” by Dr. Laura A. Cariola

See you at the seminars!

Funded by the Researcher-Led Initiative Fund

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