“Fake it till you make it: Fishing for Catfishes” by Walid Magdy et al.

Using language algorithms  to detect fake online profiles that deceive other users

Abstract

Many adult content websites incorporate social networking features. Although these are popular, they raise significant challenges, including the potential for users to “catfish”, i.e., to create fake profiles to deceive other users. This paper takes an initial step towards automated catfish detection. We explore the characteristics of the different age and gender groups, identifying a number of distinctions. Through this, we train models based on user profiles and comments, via the ground truth of specially verified profiles. Applying our models for age and gender estimation of unverified profiles, we identify 38% of profiles who are likely lying about their age, and 25% who are likely lying about their gender. We find that women have a greater propensity to catfish than men. Further, whereas women catfish select from a wide age range, men consistently lie about being younger. Our work has notable implications on operators of such online social networks, as well as users who may worry about interacting with catfishes.

Paper to appear in IEEE/ACM ASONAM 2017 https://arxiv.org/abs/1705.06530

Dr Walid Magdy, University of Edinburgh, School of Informatics.

Workshops on “Corpus Linguistics and Content Analysis”

In May and June 2017, the School of Health and Social Science at the University of Edinburgh offers a series of workshops on the use of corpus linguistics and content analysis to explore language data. Such quantitative approaches to language analysis are carried out using software and can provide in-depth insight on language use and word patterns that would be too difficult and too time-consuming to identify using qualitative methods.

New issue of “Language and Psychoanalysis” Volume 6 Issue 1 Spring/Summer 2017

We are very pleased to inform you that Volume 6 Issue 1 of the open access journal “Language and Psychoanalysis” has gone online.

http://www.language-and-psychoanalysis.com/

This issue includes the following articles:

Robert D. Stolorow, Ph.D. & George E. Atwood, Ph.D.   The Phenomenology of Language and the Metaphysicalizing of the Real

Fernanda Carrá-Salsberg, Ph.D.   A Psychoanalytic Look into The Effects of Childhood and Adolescent Migration in Eva Hoffman’s Lost in Translation

David Hafner, Ph.D.   An Introduction to the Transference Unconscious 

Rina Stahl Freedman, Ph.D.   Cross-Cultural Treatment Issues in Psychoanalysis      

Giuseppe Iurato, Ph.D.   Book Review. Reading Italian Psychoanalysis

Anonymous Author, M. A.   Book Review. Language Disorders in Children and Adolescents  

 

The journal “Language and Psychoanalysis” is also currently accepting manuscripts for the next issue in Autumn-Winter 2017.

Manuscript submission due date: 30th September 2017

Language and Psychoanalysis. Special issue on Conversational Analysis

screen-shot-2017-01-15-at-15-51-46Our guest editors Prof. Michael. B. Buchholz and Prof. Horst Kächele have put together a special issue on “Conversational Analysis in Psychotherapy Process Research”. The special issue has excellent contributions that were originally part of the panel at the 47th SPR International Annual Meeting in Jerusalem, Israel. The panel was extremely successful and produced fruitful discussions on positioning conversational analysis in the field of psychotherapy research.

The contributions of the special issue are:

http://www.language-and-psychoanalysis.com/issue/current

 

“How technology could help predict terrorist attacks” by Sheryl Prentice

image-20160620-8853-f0pz7cHow technology could help predict terrorist attacks

The internet has become a weapon for terrorists, who use social media and other technologies to organise, recruit and spread propaganda. So is it possible to turn technology around and use it to not only catch terrorists but predict and potentially stop terror attacks before they happen?

One thing we can do is use technology to search for patterns in the activity and language of terrorists and their supporters online. If we can spot trends that typically occur in the run up to an attack, it may be possible to automatically identify when future acts of violence are being planned. In a new study, researchers from Harvard University attempted to do just this. They used computer simulations to show how unofficial groups of online Islamic State (IS) supporters spread and grow through social networking sites and how this relates to the timing of violent attacks.

This follows research into how messages on Twitter can be classified to predict whether someone will support or oppose IS. Other researchers have used data-mining techniques on social media data to try to work out when supporters “begin to adopt pro-IS behaviour”.

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Dr Laura A. Cariola

Laura Cariola

Affiliation: University of Edinburgh

I am a linguist and psychologist with a special interest in psychodynamic concepts that underpin language behaviour and social interactions. Currently, I am a research assistant in Clinical Psychology at the University of Edinburgh. My research relates to public health, such as perinatal mental health and adolescents’ online behaviour.

Most of my research relates to the concept of body image boundaries and how it influences language behaviour in relation to autobiographical memories and psychotherapy processes.

I am also the co-founding editor (together with Dr. Andrew Wilson) of the journal ‘Language and Psychoanalysis’. The ‘Language and Mind Network’ which aims to bring together individuals with an interest in the intersection of language and psychology, including psychotherapy, clinical psychology and the humanities, and thus to encourage dialogue and collaboration.

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Prof Michael Buchholz

Michael Buchholz

Affiliation : International Psychoanalytic University Berlin

Prof. Dr. Michael B. Buchholz, Dipl.-Psych., Professor for Social Psychology at the International Psychoanalytic University (IPU), Berlin (Germany), head of the Dissertation Program at IPU. PhD in Psychoanalysis 1980 (Frankfurt), Habilitation in Social Sciences 1990 in Göttingen; Psychoanalyst and Training Analyst in the German Psychoanalytic Society. Editorial board of “System Familie”, “Psychotherapie und Sozialwissenschaft”, “Psychosozial”, “International Forum of Psychoanalysis”, „Language and Psychoanalysis“. More than 150 publications. Qualitative studies: analysis of a 30 session short-term therapy (1996), scenarios of contact (1997), sexual offenders in group therapy (2008), empathy conversations in psychotherapy.

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