Adogame and Spickard, eds. “Religion Crossing Boundaries”

Contents:
Preface: Real Globalization: Everything is Local ……………………………. vii
William H. Swatos, Jr.
Introduction: Africa, The New African Diaspora, and Religious
Transnationalism in a Global World …………………………………………………1
James V. Spickard and Afe Adogame
TRANSNATIONAL DYNAMICS IN AFRICAN MIGRATION
1. The Visa God: Would-Be Migrants and the
Instrumentalization of Religion ……………………………………………….. 31
Ebenezer Obadare and Wale Adebanwi
2. A Nigerian Mother in Israel at Coney Island: Authority,
Gender, and Translation in a Transnational
Yoruba Religion ……………………………………………………………………….. 49
Mei-Mei Sanford
3. Mobility and Belonging among Transnational Congolese
Pentecostal Congregations: Modernity and the
Emergence of Socioeconomic Differences ………………………………… 63
Géraldine Mossière
4. Mediating Spiritual Power: African Christianity,
Transnationalism and the Media ……………………………………………… 87
J. Kwabena Asamoah-Gyadu
TRANSNATIONAL DYNAMICS WITHIN AFRICA
5. On the Inscrutability of the Ways of God: The
Transnationalization of Pentecostalism on the
West African Coast ………………………………………………………………… 107
Joël Noret
6. Pentecostals Moving South-South: Brazilian and Ghanaian
Transnationalism in Southern Africa ……………………………………… 123
Linda van de Kamp and Rijk van Dijk
7. “When you Make Sacrifice, No One is a Stranger”:
Divination, Sacrifice and Identity among Translocals
in the West African Urban Diaspora …………………………………….. 143
Laura S. Grillo
8. The Boundary-Crossing Influence of African Initiated
Churches (AICs) on Youth in Emuhaya District,
Western Kenya ……………………………………………………………………… 165
Susan M. Kilonzo
9. Gospel without Borders: Gender Dynamics of
Transnational Religious Movements in Kenya
and the Kenyan Diaspora ……………………………………………………… 185
Damaris Seleina Parsitau and Philomena Njeri Mwaura
10. The Bonnke Effect: Encounters with Transnational
Evangelism in Southeastern Nigeria ……………………………………… 211
Edlyne E. Anugwom
WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF TRANSNATIONAL AFRICAN
RELIGIONS
11. The Pan-African Church: Nation, Self, and Spirit in
Winners’ Chapel, Nigeria ……………………………………………………… 229
Samuel Krinsky
12. Transnational Tradition: The Global Dynamics of
“African Traditional Religion” ………………………………………………. 253
Marleen de Witte

Oro, “South American Evangelicals’ Re-Conquest of Europe”

Oro, Ari Pedro. 2014. South American Evangelicals’ Re-Conquest of Europe. Journal of Contemporary Religion 29(2): 219-232.

AbstractThis article focuses on networks of South-American preachers, led by charismatic characters such as the Argentinean pastor Carlos Annacondia, who export themselves not only to countries within the Americas but also to Europe. The prevailing justification among Latin-American Evangelicals for undertaking this ‘reverse mission’ (Freston) is in the view that especially the ‘old’ Roman Catholic Europe is spiritually ‘cooled down’ and that the time is ripe for re-evangelizing it. This study analyzes the way in which network-based charismatic entrepreneurship has encouraged transnational imaginaries of re-conquering Europe spiritually, more specifically in terms of the meanings the members of these networks attribute to the ‘spiritual re-conquest’. I conclude by suggesting that, similar to flows from other regions in the global South, such as Africa, the much vaunted ‘reverse mission’ to Europe is vested with meanings that transcend the spiritual re-conquest as such. In the case of Latin America, this article argues, the chief motivation is symbolic: to strengthen the status of local churches and their leaders against the backdrop of a highly competitive religious market on the Latin-American sub-continent.

Blanes, A Prophetic Trajectory

Blanes, Ruy Llera. 2014. A Prophetic Trajectory: Ideologies of Place, Time, and Belonging in an Angolan Religious Movement. New York: Berghahn. 

Publisher’s DescriptionCombining ethnographic and historical research conducted in Angola, Portugal, and the United Kingdom, A Prophetic Trajectory tells the story of Simão Toko, the founder and leader of one of the most important contemporary Angolan religious movements. The book explains the historical, ethnic, spiritual, and identity transformations observed within the movement, and debates the politics of remembrance and heritage left behind after Toko’s passing in 1984. Ultimately, it questions the categories of prophetism and charisma, as well as the intersections between mobility, memory, and belonging in the Atlantic Lusophone sphere.

Cao, “Renegotiating Locality and Morality”

Cao, Nanlai. 2013. Renegotiating Locality and Morality in a Chinese Religious Diaspora: Wenzhou Christian Merchants in Paris, France. The Asia Pacific Journal of Anthropology 14(1).

Abstract: This paper explores the social and economic implications of indigenous Christian discourses and practices in the Wenzhou Chinese diaspora in Paris, France. Popularly known as China’s Jerusalem, the coastal Chinese city of Wenzhou is home to thousands of self-started home-grown Protestant churches and a million Protestants. Drawing on multi-sited fieldwork, this study provides an ethnographic account of a group of Wenzhou merchants who have formed large Christian communities at home, along with migrant enclaves in Paris. The study shows how these migrant entrepreneurs and traders have brought their version of Christianity from China to France and how they perceive and deal with issues of illegality, moral contingency, native-place based loyalty and national belonging. It highlights the thoroughly intertwined relationship between an indigenised Chinese Christianity and the petty capitalist legacy of coastal southeast China in a secularised, exclusionary European context, and suggests that Christianity provides a form of non-market morality that serves to effectively legitimate Wenzhou’s pre-modern household economy in the context of market modernity.